Based on the Graphic Novel of the same name, this is a dark and gritty crime story with an interesting twist.  But is it enough to make it stand out form the pack?

Certificate: 18

Director: Olivier Megaton

Screenwriter: Karl Gajdusek (screenplay by), Karl Gajdusek (story by)

Starring: Michael Pitt, Sharlto Copley, Edgar Ramírez

Genre: Action, Crime

Runtime: 148 Minutes

Rating: 2 Stars

Reviewed by: Pearl

In the not-too-distant future, as a final response to growing domestic terrorism and a shocking crime rate, the U.S. government plans to broadcast a signal making it impossible for anyone to knowingly commit unlawful acts.  In the last days before they activate the signal, a group of criminals come up with a wild plan to commit the last crime in American History.

I don’t know why ‘gritty’ crime dramas feel the need to solidify their grittiness by the use of copious violence and a ridiculous amount of bad language. Do people really talk like that?  Not to mention that the script is just one eye-rolling cliché after another, especially from poor Anna Brewster.  She really does have some doozies to get through.  Not to mention that while her character could have been really interesting and complex, she is still just another smart but underappreciated gangster doll who relies far too heavily on her body to get what she wants.  And this is just one of the exhausted clichés this film relies on.

Brick, our main character, while pulling off the brooding anti-hero pretty well, has absolutely no story at all.  We never get to know anything about him, what his background it, what his motivations are, outside of the murder of his brother of course.  It is him that is meant to be the focus of the story, but we learn so little about his that is hard to care one way or another about the things that he does.

The premise thought was really, really good.  The idea of the last mad score before all crime is put to a stop, performed by a group of desperate criminals.  The world is intriguing,  the sci fi element made it a little different from other organised crime type stories.  But the main problem with it was it’s runtime.  It runs long.  Way, way too long.  There are too many overly drawn out action sequences, too much monologing, and the end takes a really long time to actually end.  It could have been forty five minutes shorter and I don’t think the plot would have lost anything.

There is a crazy amount of very questionable accents going on in this film too, and not all of them are pulled off successfully.  Anna Brewster does a convincing American accent, but most of the others are questionable at best. 

I lost interest in this one pretty fast, a tighter plot and a vastly better script could have improved his no end, but in my opinion, skip it.  If you do want to see it for yourself, ‘The Last Days of American Crime’ is available to stream now on Netflix.