There have been more versions of Sherlock Holmes than I have had hot dinners.  This is meant to be a fresh approach to appeal to young audiences.  I think.

Certificate: 12

Director: Harry Bradbeer

Screenwriter: Nancy Springer (novel), Jack Thorne (screenplay)

Starring: Millie Bobby Brown, Henry Cavill, Sam Claflin

Genre: Adventure, Crime

Runtime: 123 Minutes

Rating: 3.5 Stars

Reviewed by: Pearl

England, 1884 – a world on the brink of change. On the morning of her 16th birthday, Enola Holmes wakes to find that her mother (Helena Bonham Carter) has disappeared, leaving behind an odd assortment of gifts but no apparent clue as to where she’s gone or why. After a free-spirited childhood, Enola suddenly finds herself under the care of her brothers Sherlock and Mycroft both set on sending her away to a finishing school. Refusing to follow their wishes, Enola escapes to search for her mother in London. But when her journey finds her entangled in a mystery surrounding a young runaway Lord, Enola becomes a super-sleuth in her own right, outwitting her famous brother as she unravels a conspiracy that threatens to set back the course of history. Written by Netflix.

Millie Bobby Brown has never really been my favourite person.  Outside of Stranger Things I always just found her kind of…meh.  But in Enola Holmes she has found her footing.  She perfectly embodies this role and you can tell that she is having an absolute blast with it.  The character is intelligent and witty and energetic, and MBB does a great job of bringing the character to life.  She really is the driving force behind the film.  It is her enthusiastic portrayal that kept me hooked the entire time through a plot that had a lot of ups and downs.  Her cast of supporting actors are no less impressive with the likes of Henry Cavill and Sam Claflin playing Sherlock and Mycroft Holmes, respectively.  I don’t know about anyone else, but I am now fully interested in a world where Henry Cavill plays Sherlock. Can we make that happen?

The plot is the weakest element of the film.  It starts out as a missing persons case for about the first half of the film, and then kind of looses it’s way, only really remembering itself right at the end of the film, when I was just as surprised as Enola when Helena Bonham Carter actually shows her face at the end, I had completely forgotten she was kind of important.  It is clearly setting up possible future instalments by establishing the friendship and perhaps budding romance with Lord Tewkesbuey, and this is one Netflix film I could stand to see maybe get that suggested sequel.  Though it rounds itself up nicely if they do decide to leave it as a single film.

Far from the cheesy mess I was expecting it to be, it could be a great watch for families or for fans of Sherlock Holmes in general who are looking for something different in the same vein. 

Enola Holmes is streaming on Netflix UK Now.