Certificate: 18

Director: Mike P. Nelson

Screenwriter: Alan B. McElroy

Starring: Charlotte Vega, Adain Bradley, Bill Sage

Genre: Horror, Thriller

Runtime: 109 Minutes

Language: English

Rating:

Reviewed by: Pearl

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Friends hiking the Appalachian Trail are confronted by ‘The Foundation’, a community of people who have lived in the mountains for hundreds of years. – From IMDB

I am such a junkie for slasher movies, and along that vein, 2003s ‘Wrong Turn’ is one of my favourite trashy horror films o put on.  It’s predictable, features the perennial favourite, inbred cannibals and you can just sit back and watch the chaos happen.  And in some ways this film is much the same.  While I didn’t see the ending coming, I definitely had my issues with the way they ended this one  More on that later, it still follows a basic formula, and from the get go you know who will survive and who won’t.

This time around we trade in our inbred cannibals, for a mountainous cult, that have lived in an isolated community for hundreds of years, and kill any outsiders that make it to the compound.  The fact that these are being capable of conversation, morality and have laws and a judicial system, however biased, means that we are already  getting a much more complex and interesting plot.  The speeches made by their leader DO make their way of life sound so much better than ours, and it makes you want to empathise with them wanting to keep it preserved.  Right until they start burning peoples eyes out that is.

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What hasn’t changed since the first film is the level of violence and gore.  This is not one for the faint hearted.  The deaths come quickly and are very, very bloody.  Heinous traps and barbaric punishments make certain parts of this film hard to watch. 

Charlotte Vega does a great job as our main lead, and embodies the role of the strong, powerful, final girl really well.  Her performance is fantastic, particularly towards the end.  The subplot following her father is an interesting choice, and I still am unsure if think the film really needed it.  The rest of her family back home that we see only briefly are almost comically awful, as are all the residents of the small town her father travels too.  All being a little too stereotypical/archetype-y for my liking. The rest of her cast of friends are competent enough actors, for the short time that we have to spend with most of them, and again fall into some very obvious archetypes, but that is something that seems to happen frequently enough in films that I think I need to accept that it will always be there.

But my main gripe was with the ending.  I thought when things were wrapping up that there seemed to be far to much time remaining, and I was right.  But I really hate films that do that fake happy ending thing.  It’s a trope that horror movies in particular utilise a lot, and it is never a favourite of mine. 

A much more decent reboot than what er are used to, and has some really great performances, loved it all but the last twenty mins or so. 

‘Wrong Turn’ is available to Rent on Amazon Prime Video now.