Certificate: 12

Director: Massimiliano Camaiti

Screenwriter: Claudia Bottino, Massimiliano Camaiti

Starring: Elvira Camarrone, Roberto Christian, Donatella Finocchiaro

Genre: Romance, Drama

Runtime: 99 Minutes

Language: Italian

Rating: 3.5 Stars

Reviewed by: Pearl

Sara meets Lorenzo at a sailing summer camp, and they begin a tentative romance.  But once they return home, Lorenzo discovers that Sara is keeping a heart-breaking secret from him.  Determined not to let that keep them apart, he inspires Sara to do more than she ever thought she could.

Straight of the bat, if you have seen more than one of these weepy, teen drama type films than you know how they are likely to end.  So just bare that in mind if you are sensitive to those kinds of subjects, go into this one a little wary, particularly towards the end. 

I was hoping for the majority of the film that this one was going to buck the trend and go in a different direction than the one that I expected, but right at the last minute, literally, we ended up exactly where I thought we would.  I wasn’t exactly surprised, but it was a little disappointed.  But for a film that deals with such heavy and upsetting material, it does manage to maintain a mostly positive outlook for most of it’s runtime, so it’s not a total downer the entire time, but there are definitely emotional moments.

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Despite the formulaic nature of the film, there were some good points.  The acting for one was pretty good among our young leads in particular.  They have great chemistry on screen and handle the tough subject matter really well.  The scenes at the rehab centre were also really well acted and added a sense of gravity and seriousness to the film.  A lot of the emotional weight comes from these scenes, so they had to be spot on, and they were for the most part.

Sports films really aren’t my thing, and a lot of the sailing terminology went right over my head, so I can’t say that I enjoyed that aspect of the film, but it did give a little depth to the characters, gave the film some kind of end goal, and gave an interesting setting to the film rather than the usual hospital or home settings we get in films like this. 

Overall if you enjoyed films like ‘The Fault in Our Stars’ or ‘All the Bright Places’ then this is another one for you along the same vein.  If weepy films aren’t your cup of tea, then I would steer clear of this one, as it follows much the same pattern.